Publications

    2018 - Publications

  • Briefing Note #3: Communicating goals and impacts of food sharing in online spaces
    SHARECITY Briefing Note #3: Communicating goals and impacts of food sharing in online spaces

    This briefing note provides a summary of the ways in which a suite of ICT-mediated food sharing initiatives from diverse cities around the world communicate both the goals and the impacts of their activities through their online profiles. These initiatives were selected from the SHARECITY100 Database (See Briefing Note 1) and nine case study cities: Athens, Greece; Barcelona, Spain; Berlin, Germany; Dublin, Ireland; London, UK; Melbourne, Australia; San Francisco, USA; and Singapore. Profiles of sharing in these cities can be found in Briefing Note 2. This analysis is a preliminary step in a process of establishing the sustainability impact and potential of diverse ICT-mediated food sharing initiatives. Further in-depth research has been conducted with each of the initiatives detailed in this document and findings will inform a process of co-designing a flexible, open-access toolkit for identifying and measuring sustainability impacts.

    Please cite as: Davies, A. et al. (2018) SHARECITY Briefing Note 3: Goals & Impacts, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. ERC Grant No: 646883 

  • Communicating Goals and Impacts of Food Sharing

    Urban Agriculture Magazine, 34: Measuring Impact

    Anna Davies, Marion Weymes, Stephen MacKenzie

    Urban food sharing – which includes collective or shared practices around growing, preparing, eating and redistributing food – is experiencing a technology-fuelled renaissance, but are these activities contributing to more sustainable food systems? Delving into the project’s research findings, this article analyses the goals of ICT-mediated urban food sharing initiatives from nine global cities and examines the ways that these organisations are communicating their activities and impacts through their online profiles. Five categories – social, environmental, economic, health and political – are used to classify goals and impacts. The article concludes by distilling the key challenges of establishing sustainability impacts.

  • SHARECITY Working Paper 3: Disruptive technologies?

    SHARECITY Working Paper 3

    Weymes, M. and Davies, A. R. (2018) Disruptive technologies? Scaling relational geographies of ICT-mediated surplus food redistribution, SHARECITY working paper 3, Trinity College Dublin.

    Abstract
    Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is increasingly mooted as a disruptive and even empowering tool for improving food systems, not least with respect to food waste prevention and the redistribution of food surplus. However, detailed analysis of the practices and impacts of such ICT-mediated redistributive mechanisms is limited. In response, this paper draws on a collaboratively designed database and interviews with key stakeholders in a redistribution ecosystem in order to critically examine how ICT is being used to augment surplus food redistribution, and to interrogate the contention that its role in the process is disruptive and empowering. First, the landscapes of ICT-mediated surplus food redistribution initiatives across 100 cities are mapped, detailing their location, form, function and ICT-mediation, followed by an in-depth analysis of one transnational ICT-mediated surplus food redistribution initiative, FoodCloud, who has matched thousands of retailers and charities and redistributed nearly 10,000 kilograms of surplus food across the UK and Ireland since 2014. Although ICT has been a necessary element in their rapid scaling and radical disruption of the landscape of surplus food redistribution, particularly within Ireland, this research finds that ICT alone is insufficient to build and maintain the required relationalities between donors and recipients, and systemic restructuring of agri-food systems to eliminate food waste and food insecurity is not resolvable by a technical fix. Ultimately, the impact of ICT-mediated surplus food redistribution efforts on state, market and society is still emerging and requires longitudinal analysis and agreed systems of assessment to capture both the affect and effects of ICT-mediated surplus food redistribution.

  • Food sharing with a 21st-century twist – and Melbourne’s a world leader

    Food sharing is experiencing a renaissance in cities around the world. By food sharing, we mean the collaborative growing, cooking, eating and distributing of food
    as well as sharing food-related skills, spaces and tools. This is nothing new, of course, but new socio-technologies are being used to reshape food-sharing opportunities. These range from apps for sharing home-cooked meals to online maps showing surplus harvests in the city.

    SHARECITY100, a database covering 100 cities, ranks Melbourne as the third most active food-sharing city, after London and New York. Melbourne is home to more than 100 diverse food-sharing initiatives mediated by information and communication technology.

    Published online: 29 May 2018.

    Read the full article here

    Ferne Edwards and Anna Davies

  • Connective Consumptions: Mapping Melbourne’s Food Sharing Ecosystem

    Connective Consumptions: Mapping Melbourne’s Food Sharing Ecosystem

    Food sharing, understood as the collaborative growing, cooking, eating and distributing of food, as well as the sharing of food related skills, spaces and tools, is experiencing a renaissance in cities. From meal sharing apps that are used to exchange home-cooked meals to online maps that reveal surplus harvests, innovative technologies are reshaping food sharing practices. Such initiatives intersect with other food and social movements to form what could be described as “food sharing ecosystems”. This paper applies assemblage theory to four food sharing initiatives in Melbourne, Australia, to ascertain the implications of their ecosystems for urban planning and policy.

    To cite this article: Ferne Edwards & Anna R. Davies (2018): Connective Consumptions: Mapping Melbourne’s Food Sharing Ecosystem, Urban Policy and Research, DOI: 10.1080/08111146.2018.1476231

    Ferne Edwards and Anna Davies

  • Book chapter: Sharing foodscapes: Messy ethnographies

    Book chapter in: Plows (ed.) 2018: Messy Ethnographies in Action, Vernon Press: Wilmington, DE. 978-1-62273-329-3. pp 167-175

    Abstract

    Food sharing practices, including food sharing mediated by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), are evolving across urban foodscapes globally. Using ethnographic case studies of ICT-mediated food sharing, this chapter explores the ways in which food sharing has developed in Singapore and connects with, or diverges from, broader narratives and practices around the smart governance of food in the city-state. This chapter first reflects on the methodological messiness inherent in researching social phenomena, such as food sharing, in different political and socio-cultural contexts. It is then argued that the milieu of food sharing itself is ‘messy’ as it includes a diverse range of practices and participants that ebb and flow over time and space connected through both physical spaces and virtual platforms. The research presented in this chapter highlights community actions related to food sharing that point towards a new understanding of what it might mean to transition towards a smarter and more sustainable city.

    Please cite this book chapter as:

    Rut, M. and Davies, A.R. (2018) Sharing foodscapes: shaping urban foodscapes through messy processes of food sharing, in Plows (ed.) Messy Ethnographies in Action, Vernon Press: Wilmington, DE. 978-1-62273-329-3. pp 167-175

    Available from: https://vernonpress.com/book/385

  • Transitioning without confrontation? Shared food growing niches and sustainable food transitions in Singapore

    Abstract

    Following a series of global food crises and an increasing dependence on food imports, the Singaporean government has begun to support local food production as a means to improve the sustainability of its food regime. This extends to the development of state-led ventures which support shared food growing in the city. In parallel, informal citizens’ groups are experimenting with collaborative forms of food provisioning. Both types of initiatives utilise Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to facilitate their practices of shared growing and seek to reorient the current food regime onto a more sustainable pathway. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted with two initiatives representative of both organisational positions, this paper critically examines the efficacy of using a transitions thinking approach to assess their actual and potential contribution to the disruption of the food regime in Singapore. The paper first reviews existing approaches to transitions thinking in order to distil insights for examining shared food growing initiatives in Singapore as niche projects. The broader socio-cultural and political context of Singapore’s food system and the food growing niche projects which are emerging within it are then delineated, followed by a strategic niche management (SNM) analysis of the two initiatives. Ultimately, the paper makes two linked contributions: firstly, it diversifies the empirical foundations and the sectoral and geographical reach of sustainability transitions research. Secondly, it provides space for critical reflection on transitions thinking when applied beyond the Western liberal democratic settings from which it emerged.

    Please cite this article as:

    Rut, M. and Davies, A. (2018): Transitioning without confrontation? Shared food growing niches and sustainable food transitions in Singapore; Geoforum (96), 11/2018, p. 278-288, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.07.016.

  • Sharing food and risk in Berlin’s urban food commons

    Abstract

    Public fridges are open-access community-stewarded spaces where food can be freely and anonymously shared. As such, they are fertile ground for understanding the obstacles and opportunities for governing food as a commons. This paper examines the governance strategies that have developed within and around Foodsharing.de, a grassroots food-rescue network in Berlin, to manage food as a commons. Analyzing the commoning of food in Foodsharing.de provides a novel entry point into the multi-scalar and multi-stakeholder governance processes that shape our broader food system. In this paper, I further develop the concept of urban food commons to specifically analyze the governance of food and risk. In particular, I draw on qualitative research to analyze a conflict between Foodsharing.de and the Berlin Food Safety Authority over the potential health and safety risks of public fridges. Building on this, I show how different governance practices, informed by different risk ontologies and understandings of the common good/hazard of food, come into tension through the everyday practices of sharing food. This paper departs from previous research that has focused on how the benefits of food commons are shared and regulated at various scales, to also explore how their risks are managed, or could be managed, within an urban food commons framework.

    Please cite this article as:

    Morrow, O. (2018): Sharing food and risk in Berlin’s urban food commons. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.003

  • Cooking and eating together in London

    Abstract

    Commensality, the act of eating together, is an important human ritual that benefits beyond the biological need for food and it is well established amongst food studies scholars. At the same time, novel forms of social eating are emerging in urban contexts, especially mediated by new technologies. Yet, ICT-mediated urban food sharing and the moments of commensality they generate have received limited attention to date. In response, this paper draws on ethnographic fieldwork with three urban food sharing initiatives in London – a city which exhibits an active and dynamic urban food sharing ecosystem, to explore the experiences of commensality that are produced. By employing qualitative methods of enquiry, I illustrate how these initiatives go beyond the food offered by engaging with the material and affective elements of cooking and eating together and how they attempt to nurture collective spaces of encounter. Social isolation and loneliness emerge within this research as central drivers for participating in food sharing initiatives. The paper concludes that these collective spaces and the affective qualities that they generate are particularly vital in urban contexts in times of austerity, as these initiatives have capacity to embrace social differences and to facilitate the circulation of ideas and practices of care and hospitality. They operate as provisional bridging mechanisms between people, communities, projects and services, providing the connective tissue in ways which are hard to measure through simple quantitative measures and, as a result, are rarely articulated.

    Please cite this article as:

    Marovelli, B. (2018): Cooking and eating together in London: Food sharing initiatives as collective spaces of encounter. Geoforum. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.003

  • [Re]Valuing Surplus: Transitions, technologies and tensions in redistributing prepared food in San Francisco

    Abstract

    Attention to value, exchange and circulation has long been a central feature of trade flow analyses. More recently, scholars have sought to extend these frames to examine the ongoing movements of end-of-life goods; essentially examining the waste mobilities of commodities. These flows have particular geographies and practices of valuing and revalorization depending on the material and relational qualities of the commodities in question. However, surprisingly little analysis has taken place of the movement of food surplus within these debates and even less has been conducted with respect to the movements of surplus prepared food. In response, this paper examines the particular value choreography of redistributing surplus prepared food in San Francisco. Four initiatives, which use information and communication technologies (ICT) to help put this particularly challenging form of food surplus to further use, are analysed. Specific attention is given to the transitions, technologies and tensions that shape the [re]valuing of surplus food in places and as it travels across space and time amongst diverse actors. In conclusion, it is argued that while commercial economic values and logics play a pivotal role in opening up particular types of food for redistribution, actual practices of moving food along are suffused with a much more complex and shifting architecture of values and valuers.

    Please cite this article as:

    Davies, A. and Weymes, M. (2018): [Re]Valuing Surplus: Transitions, technologies and tensions in redistributing prepared food in San Francisco. GeoForum. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.11.005

  • Urban food sharing: Emerging geographies of production, consumption and exchange

    ABSTRACT

    The role of urban areas in shaping global futures has never been clearer. However, their complex socio-technical systems are under stress and unlikely to experience any respite as populations grow and as patterns of production and consumption resist transition to more sustainable pathways. Urban food systems are not exempt from these pressures, however they are the subject of ongoing experimentation and innovation, particularly around the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). Urban food sharing is one such arena of experimentation. It includes collective and collaborative practices around food, from shared growing, cooking and eating and the redistribution of surplus food, to the sharing of spaces and devices. This themed issue brings together cuttingedge scholarship on what it means to share food in contemporary cities around the globe. All papers contribute to debates about how things become food, whether that is in relation to the rules and governing systems that shape and discipline these becomings, or the practices of exchange and consumption that follow. Together they develop geographically-sensitive approaches to sharing that better comprehend the relations between scale, space and place. This paper maps the terrain of urban food sharing, introduces key conceptual approaches, identifies common themes, and proposes an agenda for future studies.

    Please cite this article as:

    Davies and Evans (2018) Urban food sharing: Emerging geographies of production, consumption and exchange, GeoForum. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.11.015

  • 2017 - Publications

  • Briefing Note #1: The SHARECITY100 Database

    SHARECITY Briefing Note #1

    This briefing note provides a high level summary of findings from the SHARECITY100 Database, the initial phase of the SHARECITY project, which details and categorises more than 4000 initiatives from 100 cities across 44 countries and six continents. The resulting food sharing database is both productive and performative; progressing understanding of, and making visible, the multiple and hybrid ways in which food (and food-related stuff, spaces and skills) is shared across diverse urban settings.

    Please Cite as: Davies, A., and Weymes, M. (2017) SHARECITY Briefing Note 1: The SHARECITY100 Database, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

     

     

     

  • Creative construction: crafting, negotiating and performing urban food sharing landscapes

    Please view full paper here.

    Activities utilising online tools are an increasingly visible part of our everyday lives, providing new subjects, objects and relationships – essentially new landscapes – for research, as well as new conceptual and methodological challenges for researchers. In parallel, calls for collaborative interdisciplinary, even transdisciplinary, research are increasing. Yet practical guidance and critical reflection on the challenges and opportunities of conducting collaborative research online, particularly in emergent areas, is limited. In response, this paper details what we term the ‘creative construction’ involved in a collaborative project building an exploratory database of more than 4000 food sharing activities in 100 cities that utilise internet and digital technologies in some way (ICT mediated for brevity) to pursue their goals. The research was undertaken by an international team of researchers, including geographers, which utilised a combination of reflexive coding and online collaboration to develop a system for exploring the practice and performance of ICT-mediated food sharing in cities. This paper will unpack the black box of using the internet as a source of data about emergent practices and provide critical reflection on that highly negotiated and essentially handcrafted process. While the substance of the paper focuses on the under-determined realm of food sharing, a site where it is claimed that ICT is transforming practices, the issues raised have resonance far beyond the specificities of this particular endeavour. While challenging, we argue that handcrafting systems for navigating emergent online data is vital, not least to render visible the complexities and contestations around definition, categorisation and translation.

  • Sharing economies: moving beyond binaries in a digital age

    Please view full paper here.

    In periods of turbulence, the tendency to simplify messages and polarise debates is nothing new. In our hyper-mediated world of online technologies, where it seems that even national policy can be forged in the 140 characters of Twitter, it is more important than ever to retain spaces for in-depth debate of emergent phenomena that have disruptive and transformative potential. In this article, we follow this logic and argue that to fully understand the diverse range of practices and potential consequences of activities uncomfortably corralled under the ambiguous term ‘the sharing economy’ requires not a simplification of arguments, but an opening out of horizons to explore the many ways in which these phenomena have emerged and are evolving. It is argued that this will require attention to multiple terrains, from diverse intellectual traditions across many disciplines to the thus far largely reactive responses of government and regulation, and from the world of techno-innovation start-ups to the optics of media (including social media) reporting on what it means to ‘share’ in the 21st century. Building on this, we make the case for viewing ‘the sharing economy’ as a matrix of diverse economies with clear links to past practices. We propose that to build a grammar for understanding these diverse sharing economies requires further attention to: (1) The etymology of sharing and sharing economies; (2) The differentiated geographies to which sharing economies contribute; (3) What it means to labour, work and be employed in sharing economies; (4) The role of the state and others in governing, regulating and shaping the organisation and practice of sharing economies; and (5) the impacts of sharing economies. In conclusion, we suggest that while media interest may fade as their presence in everyday lives becomes less novel, understanding sharing economies remains an urgent activity if we are to ensure that the new ways of living and labouring, to which sharing economies are contributing, work to promote sustainable and inclusive development in this world that ultimately we all share.

  • Making visible: Interrogating the performance of food sharing across 100 urban areas

    Please view full paper here.

    Interpersonal sharing of food has been an omnipresent feature of human civilisation from hunter-gatherer societies to the present, both as a mechanism through which sustenance is secured and as a means to cement social relations. While the evolutionary dynamism of this food sharing is relatively well documented, critical scholarship has tended to examine contemporary food sharing practices beyond family and friends through case studies of individual initiatives. A broader view of food sharing practices is absent. In addition, there has been little examination of the role that emerging information and communication technologies (ICT) are having on food sharing, despite claims that such technologies offer transformative potential to achieve more secure, sustainable and just food systems. In response, this paper presents a novel landscape level analysis of more than 4000 ICT-mediated urban food sharing activities operating across 100 cities in six continents. Adopting conceptual insights from the intersection of social and economic practice-oriented approaches, the resulting foodsharing database progresses understanding of, and makes visible, the ways in which food (and food-related skills, stuff and spaces) is being shared across diverse urban settings. To conclude, it is argued that the database plays an important productive and performative role in mapping and comparing diverse food sharing economies. Importantly, it provides a springboard for further explanatory research to fine-tune our understanding of the evolution, governance and sustainability potential of urban food sharing.

  • Briefing Note #2: SHARECITY Profiles

    SHARECITY Briefing Note #2

    This briefing note provides an introduction to ten cities – Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, Dublin, London, Melbourne, New York City, San Francisco, Singapore and Zurich – in terms of their food sharing landscape and wider socioeconomic, environmental and governing context. These cities have been selected from the SHARECITY100 database, and researchers will build on these
    profiles through in-depth ethnographic research with a number of ICT-mediated food sharing initiatives and wider stakeholders in each city.

    Please Cite as: Davies, A., and Weymes, M. (2017) SHARECITY Briefing Note 2: The SHARECITY100 Database, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

  • Food Safety Governance and Food Redistribution: A Multilevel Governance Analysis of Food Safety Policy in Urban ICT-Mediated Food Sharing

    MSc Environmental Sciences – Dissertation – Alan Dowdall

    Sustainability is a major issue facing society today, posing a number of challenges to our food, water, energy and human systems. Various international and regional attempts have been made to tackle these issues (UN, 2015; EC, 2015), with the aim of creating a more sustainable and circular economy which uses resources more efficiently. Food waste is one of the most pressing issues which must be dealt with, due to growing populations and increased pressure on land use (Scanlon, et al., 2017). The redistribution of surplus food has been identified as one of the most innovative and effective methods to help reduce food waste (Capodistrias, 2015), and its expansion and growth is encouraged by the EU (Vittuari, et al., 2016; Vituarri, et al., 2015). Food safety and hygiene regulations have been highlighted as a major barrier to this growth (Vituarri, et al., 2015). This study aims to assess the place of food safety regulation in European food redistribution organisations (FRO), and elicit the views of these organisations on regulations and how they should develop in the future. This will be carried out through a multilevel governance analysis, including European food safety policy review, national policy content analysis, surveys with local FRO and a case study on the operation of public fridges, including surveys and media analysis.

    This study found that food safety has an important place in European food policy, outlining the general risk-based, scientific approach to food safety management in several regulatory instruments. National food safety policy channels these principles into set standards and procedures, providing more practical regulation of food businesses. National food safety authorities provide viewpoints on the importance of food safety and its place in food redistribution. Local FRO place a high level of importance on food safety and clearly understand the risks it poses. They implement these standards and procedures in a number of ways to maintain food safety and prevent public health risks. The majority of FRO surveyed in this study believed that current regulations are restrictive and too strong, and would like to see changes to education and awareness are food waste issues, as well as guidelines on the interpretation of food safety regulations in redistributive services and the creation of a standard quality system for all actors involved in redistribution.

    The novel data collected in this study highlights the complexity of food waste and food safety management and the difficultly in reconciling both of their aims. Dealing with barriers such as food safety to innovative solutions like food redistribution is important to allow for their expansion and growth in accordance with proper regulations. Tackling this issue now, thorough official guidance and interpretation, allows for the optimal performance of both food redistributors and the regulations which govern them in the future.

    Keywords: food safety, food sharing, food redistribution, European policy, policy analysis.

  • 2016 - Publications

  • SHARECITY Working paper 1: Typologies of Food Sharing

    Sharing economies, particularly those enabled by internet, smart or mobile technology, are being identified across diverse territories, including the food sector, as potential means to enact urban sustainability transitions. However, to date, there has been little conceptual or empirical attention to these developments within the broad landscape of food sharing, with case study analyses of individual enterprises dominating empirical work in the field. This paper provides the first macro-geographical analysis of urban food sharing enabled by such technologies. Focusing on individual food sharing enterprises drawn from a database of more than 5000 enterprises, within 468 urban areas and 91 countries, this analysis reveals a variegated geography of food sharing in terms of location, what is being shared and the mode of food sharing adopted. Also documented is the extent to which these enterprises articulate sustainability claims from their activities and provide evidence to substantiate these claims. In conclusion, the paper outlines a strategy for connecting this macro-level analysis with the contingent material and relational practices of urban food sharing to establish more precisely its practice and sustainability potential.

  • SHARECITY Working Paper 2: Urban Food Sharing Scoping Database

    Sharing economies, particularly those enabled by internet, smart or mobile technology, are being identified across diverse territories, including the food sector, as potential means to enact urban sustainability transitions. However, to date, there has been little conceptual or empirical attention to these developments within the broad landscape of food sharing, with case study analyses of individual enterprises dominating empirical work in the field. This paper provides the first macro-geographical analysis of urban food sharing enabled by such technologies. Focusing on individual food sharing enterprises drawn from a database of more than 5000 enterprises, within 468 urban areas and 91 countries, this analysis reveals a variegated geography of food sharing in terms of location, what is being shared and the mode of food sharing adopted. Also documented is the extent to which these enterprises articulate sustainability claims from their activities and provide evidence to substantiate these claims. In conclusion, the paper outlines a strategy for connecting this macro-level analysis with the contingent material and relational practices of urban food sharing to establish more precisely its practice and sustainability potential.

  • Assessing the Sustainability of ICT Enabled Urban Food Sharing in Dublin

    Assessing the Sustainability of ICT Enabled Urban Food Sharing in Dublin

    Benjamin Murphy

    MSc. Environmental Sciences
    Trinity College
    University of Dublin
    Supervised by Dr. Anna Davies

    Word Count: 15,785 (Including headings and in-text references)

    A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Environmental Sciences, Trinity College, University of Dublin.
    October, 2016

  • 2015 - Publications

  • FARE SHARE CITIES: Transitioning to more sustainable urban eating?

    Anna R. Davies

    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

    Working Paper – INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY TRANSITIONS CONFERENCE

    Contact: daviesa@tcd.ie

  • Transforming Household Consumption: From Backcasting to HomeLabs Experiments

    Following the rhetoric of an impending “perfect storm” of increasing demand for energy, water, and food, it is recognized that ensuring sustainability will require significant shifts in both production and consumption patterns. This recognition has stimulated a plethora of future-oriented studies often using scenario, visioning, and transition planning techniques. These approaches have produced a multitude of plans for future development, but many valorize technological fixes and give limited attention to the governance and practice of everyday consumption. In contrast, this article presents empirical findings from a practice-oriented participatory (POP) backcasting process focused on home heating, personal washing, and eating. This process provided spaces for collaborative learning, creative innovation, and interdisciplinary interaction as well as producing a suite of ideas around promising practices for more sustainable household consumption. Further action is required, however, to explore how such ideas might be translated into action. The article concludes by outlining how collaborative experiments among public, private, civil society, and citizen-consumers, or HomeLabs, provide a means to test and evaluate the promising practices developed through POP backcasting. Key Words: governance, social practices, socioecological systems, sustainable consumption, transformations.

  • Disrupting household food consumption through experimental HomeLabs: Outcomes, connections, contexts

    This article explores the implications of conceptualising, designing and implementing experimental sites seeking to support more sustainable home-based eating practices, or HomeLabs for brevity. Building on earlier phases of practice-oriented participatory backcasting and transition framework construction, the HomeLabs involved collaboration with public, private and civil society sectors and with the members of participating households. These collaborations identified a suite of supportive socio-technological, informational and governance interventions that mimicked, as far as possible, the characteristics of promising practices for sustainable eating developed through backcasting and transition planning. The implemented interventions enabled householders to question, disassemble and reconfigure their eating practices onto more sustainable pathways across the integrated practices of food acquisition, storage, preparation and waste management. This process generated manifold insights into household eating practices, and this article focuses specifically on key outcomes of the HomeLabs, and the significance of social context, social relations and micropolitics of everyday life in shaping those outcomes. In particular, the HomeLabs findings reinforce calls to connect, combine and align product, regulatory, informational and motivational supports across the interdependent practices of eating (acquisition, storage and preparation and waste recovery) to optimise transitions towards sustainability. Offering a lens to interrogate interventions for sustainable food consumption in the home, this article provides a novel exercise in operationalising social practice theory.


© 2015 - 2018 ShareCity | Web Design Agency Webbiz.ie