Publications

    2017 - Publications

  • Briefing Note #1: The SHARECITY100 Database

    SHARECITY Briefing Note #1

    This briefing note provides a high level summary of findings from the SHARECITY100 Database, the initial phase of the SHARECITY project, which details and categorises more than 4000 initiatives from 100 cities across 44 countries and six continents. The resulting food sharing database is both productive and performative; progressing understanding of, and making visible, the multiple and hybrid ways in which food (and food-related stuff, spaces and skills) is shared across diverse urban settings.

    Please Cite as: Davies, A., and Weymes, M. (2017) SHARECITY Briefing Note 1: The SHARECITY100 Database, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

     

     

     

  • 2016 - Publications

  • SHARECITY Working paper 1: Typologies of Food Sharing

    Sharing economies, particularly those enabled by internet, smart or mobile technology, are being identified across diverse territories, including the food sector, as potential means to enact urban sustainability transitions. However, to date, there has been little conceptual or empirical attention to these developments within the broad landscape of food sharing, with case study analyses of individual enterprises dominating empirical work in the field. This paper provides the first macro-geographical analysis of urban food sharing enabled by such technologies. Focusing on individual food sharing enterprises drawn from a database of more than 5000 enterprises, within 468 urban areas and 91 countries, this analysis reveals a variegated geography of food sharing in terms of location, what is being shared and the mode of food sharing adopted. Also documented is the extent to which these enterprises articulate sustainability claims from their activities and provide evidence to substantiate these claims. In conclusion, the paper outlines a strategy for connecting this macro-level analysis with the contingent material and relational practices of urban food sharing to establish more precisely its practice and sustainability potential.

  • SHARECITY Working Paper 2: Urban Food Sharing Scoping Database

    Sharing economies, particularly those enabled by internet, smart or mobile technology, are being identified across diverse territories, including the food sector, as potential means to enact urban sustainability transitions. However, to date, there has been little conceptual or empirical attention to these developments within the broad landscape of food sharing, with case study analyses of individual enterprises dominating empirical work in the field. This paper provides the first macro-geographical analysis of urban food sharing enabled by such technologies. Focusing on individual food sharing enterprises drawn from a database of more than 5000 enterprises, within 468 urban areas and 91 countries, this analysis reveals a variegated geography of food sharing in terms of location, what is being shared and the mode of food sharing adopted. Also documented is the extent to which these enterprises articulate sustainability claims from their activities and provide evidence to substantiate these claims. In conclusion, the paper outlines a strategy for connecting this macro-level analysis with the contingent material and relational practices of urban food sharing to establish more precisely its practice and sustainability potential.

  • Assessing the Sustainability of ICT Enabled Urban Food Sharing in Dublin

    Assessing the Sustainability of ICT Enabled Urban Food Sharing in Dublin

    Benjamin Murphy

    MSc. Environmental Sciences
    Trinity College
    University of Dublin
    Supervised by Dr. Anna Davies

    Word Count: 15,785 (Including headings and in-text references)

    A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Environmental Sciences, Trinity College, University of Dublin.
    October, 2016

  • 2015 - Publications

  • FARE SHARE CITIES: Transitioning to more sustainable urban eating?

    Anna R. Davies

    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

    Working Paper – INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY TRANSITIONS CONFERENCE

    Contact: daviesa@tcd.ie

  • Transforming Household Consumption: From Backcasting to HomeLabs Experiments

    Following the rhetoric of an impending “perfect storm” of increasing demand for energy, water, and food, it is recognized that ensuring sustainability will require significant shifts in both production and consumption patterns. This recognition has stimulated a plethora of future-oriented studies often using scenario, visioning, and transition planning techniques. These approaches have produced a multitude of plans for future development, but many valorize technological fixes and give limited attention to the governance and practice of everyday consumption. In contrast, this article presents empirical findings from a practice-oriented participatory (POP) backcasting process focused on home heating, personal washing, and eating. This process provided spaces for collaborative learning, creative innovation, and interdisciplinary interaction as well as producing a suite of ideas around promising practices for more sustainable household consumption. Further action is required, however, to explore how such ideas might be translated into action. The article concludes by outlining how collaborative experiments among public, private, civil society, and citizen-consumers, or HomeLabs, provide a means to test and evaluate the promising practices developed through POP backcasting. Key Words: governance, social practices, socioecological systems, sustainable consumption, transformations.

  • Disrupting household food consumption through experimental HomeLabs: Outcomes, connections, contexts

    This article explores the implications of conceptualising, designing and implementing experimental sites seeking to support more sustainable home-based eating practices, or HomeLabs for brevity. Building on earlier phases of practice-oriented participatory backcasting and transition framework construction, the HomeLabs involved collaboration with public, private and civil society sectors and with the members of participating households. These collaborations identified a suite of supportive socio-technological, informational and governance interventions that mimicked, as far as possible, the characteristics of promising practices for sustainable eating developed through backcasting and transition planning. The implemented interventions enabled householders to question, disassemble and reconfigure their eating practices onto more sustainable pathways across the integrated practices of food acquisition, storage, preparation and waste management. This process generated manifold insights into household eating practices, and this article focuses specifically on key outcomes of the HomeLabs, and the significance of social context, social relations and micropolitics of everyday life in shaping those outcomes. In particular, the HomeLabs findings reinforce calls to connect, combine and align product, regulatory, informational and motivational supports across the interdependent practices of eating (acquisition, storage and preparation and waste recovery) to optimise transitions towards sustainability. Offering a lens to interrogate interventions for sustainable food consumption in the home, this article provides a novel exercise in operationalising social practice theory.


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